Here comes the sun

August 11th, 2014

Here Comes the Sun!

We wait for it all winter long and then there it is – that glorious sunshine! It literally and emotionally brightens our day. But we also need to be careful of its effects when we stay outside as the days get longer. Sunburn can be a bad side effect of soaking up those warm rays.

The first signs of a sunburn may not appear for a few hours. By the time the skin starts to become painful and red, the damage has already been done. The pain is worst between 6 and 48 hours after your exposure to the sun. In severe sunburns, your skin may blister.

If you have a sunburn you can try a few things at home to relieve the pain. Take a cool bath or shower or apply a cool, clean damp towel to your injured skin. Apply aloe vera or moisturizing lotion several times a day. Take over-the-counter pain reliever like aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen or acetaminophen.

The flip side is what not to put on your skin if you have sunburn. Don’t use petroleum jelly, butter, egg whites or other home remedies on your sunburned skin. They can actually prevent or delay healing.

If you or a loved one experience the following symptoms after sun exposure, call a healthcare provider immediately or go to your nearest emergency room:

  • fever or chills
  • shock
  • dehydration
  • confusion
  • nausea or vomiting
  • the sunburned person is a child under a year old
  • the burn has blisters or the skin appears white or is numb

Possible Complications

Soaking up the sun for extended periods of time can put you at risk for possible complications. If your skin blisters and the blisters rupture, you are at risk for bacterial infection. Also, you could be accelerating the aging process of your skin, a condition called Photoaging that can leave you with deep wrinkles, freckles, large brown lesions, fine red veins on your cheeks, nose and ears or even thinner, more translucent skin.

Other even more intense issues could include Actinic Keratoses, considered a precancerous condition that appears as rough scaly patches in sun-exposed areas, skin cancer and/or eye damage.

Prevention is the best way to be “sun safe”

We all want to enjoy the sunshine and have fun outside, so be sure to take preventative measures so that you can continue to enjoy it every day and not have any sun side effects.
Wear a wide-brim hat and sunglasses to help protect your eyes from harmful UVA and UVB rays. Loose, lightweight shirts will also provide an appropriate amount of protection, but the most important item to wear is sunscreen.

The American Cancer Society encourages the “Slip! Slop! Slap! and Wrap” method to protecting you and your loved ones from the sun’s harmful rays:

  • Slip on a shirt – wear clothes to protect your skin
  • Slop on sunscreen – a palmful every two hours and more often if you are swimming or sweating
  • Slap on a hat – a wide brim hat is best to protect your ears, eyes, forehead, nose and scalp
  • Wrap on sunglasses – choose glasses that block 99% to 100% of UVA and UVB radiation

 

With so many products on the shelf, how do you choose what’s best for you? While no sunscreen will block all UV rays, a broad-spectrum sunscreen which contains active chemical and physical sunscreen ingredients is a good choice. Broad spectrum sunscreens contain ingredients to protect against exposure to both UVB and UVA lights.

Read the Label
Look for three active ingredients when you’re selecting your sunscreen:

  1. Padimate O (Octyldimethyl PABA), Homosalate, Octisalate (Octyl salicylate), or Octinoxate (Octyl methoxycinnamate or OCM) for blocking UVB rays.
  2. Avobenzone (Parsol 1789) or Ecamsule (Mexoryl) for blocking UVA rays.
  3. Octocrylene, Titanium Dioxide, or Zinc Oxide for blocking both UVA and UVB rays.

 

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends everyone use sunscreen that offers the following:

  • Broad-spectrum protection (protects against UVA and UVB rays)
  • Sun Protection Factor (SPF) 30 or greater
  • Water resistance (up to 40 or 80 minutes)

 

When using sunscreen, one key thing to remember is that regardless of the SPF or whether its waterproof, it’s important to re-apply sunscreen every two hours to make sure the ingredients are still active. For more information, go to SkinCancer.org and search “sunscreen” and talk with your dermatologist about skin and sun safety.

Did you know?
Sunscreen is considered an over-the-counter drug by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) who regulates sunscreen safety and effectiveness and governs the manufacture and marketing of all sunscreen products including safety data.

Cholesterol affects more than your heart

August 11th, 2014

Cholesterol affects more than your Heart

CHOLESTEROL

It may surprise you to know that cholesterol itself isn’t bad. Cholesterol is just one of the many substances created and used by our bodies to keep us healthy.

About 75% of the cholesterol we need is produced naturally by our liver and other cells in our bodies while the rest comes from the food we eat – more specifically, animal products.

A cholesterol screening measures your level of High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) and Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL).  HDL is a “good” cholesterol which helps keep the LDL cholesterol from getting lodged into your artery walls.  A healthy level of HDL may also protect against heart attack and stroke, while low levels of HDL have been shown to increase the risk of heart disease.  

When too much LDL circulates in the blood, it can clog arteries, increasing your risk of heart attack, stroke and peripheral vascular disease.

LDL cholesterol is produced naturally by the body, but many people inherit the genes that cause the body to make too much LDL from their parents and grandparents. Eating saturated fat, trans fats and dietary cholesterol also increases your LDL levels.

If high blood cholesterol runs in your family, lifestyle modifications may not be enough to help lower your LDL blood cholesterol. Everyone is different, so it’s important to work with your doctor to find a treatment plan that’s best for you.

 

ATHEROSCLEROSIS

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries and this usually starts in early adulthood. Arteries are the blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood to your heart and other parts of your body.

Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Dr. Vakani says that over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. This limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the various organs in your body, including your heart and brain.

Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including heart attack, stroke, or even death; and it can affect any artery in the body, including arteries in the heart, brain, arms, legs, pelvis, and kidneys. As a result, different diseases may develop based on which arteries are affected:

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HEART > Coronary Heart Disease
Coronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease, is the #1 killer of both men and women in the United States. CHD occurs when plaque builds up in the coronary arteries. These arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to your heart.

Plaque narrows the coronary arteries and reduces blood flow to your heart muscle. Plaque buildup also makes it more likely that blood clots will form in your arteries. Blood clots can partially or completely block blood flow. If blood flow to your heart muscle is reduced or blocked, you may have angina (chest pain or discomfort) or a heart attack.

Plaque also can form in the heart’s smallest arteries. This disease is called coronary microvascular disease (MVD). In coronary MVD, plaque doesn’t cause blockages in the arteries as it does in CHD.

NECK > Carotid Artery Disease
Carotid (ka-ROT-id) artery disease occurs if plaque builds up in the arteries on each side of your neck (the carotid arteries). These arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to your brain. If blood flow to your brain is reduced or blocked, you may have a stroke.

LEGS, ARMS, PELVIS >Peripheral Artery Disease

Peripheral arterial disease (P.A.D.) occurs if plaque builds up in the major arteries that supply oxygen-rich blood to your legs, arms, and pelvis.

If blood flow to these parts of your body is reduced or blocked, you may have numbness, pain, and, sometimes, dangerous infections.

KIDNEY > Chronic Kidney Disease
Chronic kidney disease can occur if plaque builds up in the renal arteries. These arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to your kidneys.

Over time, chronic kidney disease causes a slow loss of kidney function. The main function of the kidneys is to remove waste and extra water from the body.

Are You at Increased Risk?

High levels of bad cholesterol are not the only risk factor that can contribute to plaque buildup. Other risk factors, such as diabetes, family history of early heart disease, high blood pressure, age, obesity, and smoking can also play a role. If you have high cholesterol plus any of these additional risk factors, talk to your doctor about how to keep your cholesterol under control.

Need a cardiologist? Visit our online Find a Physician tool at HarnettHealth.org.

Stroke – a Matter of Minutes

August 11th, 2014

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Tick…tick…tick…every second counts if you or a loved one is having a stroke. A few hours can make a big difference between recovery or death. If you think you or someone near you is having a stroke, don’t hesitate to call 911.

“Typically you have about three hours from the time of your first stroke symptom to get treatment to minimize damage to your brain that can cause serious, long-term disabilities,” says Dr. Rajesh Vakani, MD, board certified cardiologist on staff with Harnett Health. “It is best to seek immediate medical help if you think you are having a stroke.”

The National Stroke Association suggests that you remember the word “FAST” to help determine if you or a loved one is having a stroke.

F – Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?
A – Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
S – Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is their speech slurred or strange?
T – Time: If you observe any of these signs, immediately call 911.

“If you notice one or more of the warning signs of a stroke, make a note of when the symptom(s) begin to tell your healthcare provider,” continues Dr. Vakani. “Knowing when symptoms being will help determine the best course of treatment.”

What is it and what causes it?
A stroke happens when the blood supply to part of your brain is stopped or significantly reduced. This deprives the brain of oxygen and food and within minutes brain cells begin to die.

“There are three main types of stroke: a blocked artery (ischemic stroke), a leaking or burst blood vessel (hemorrhagic stroke), or a temporary disruption of blood flow to the brain (transient ischemic attack),” explains Dr. Vakani.

Ischemic Stroke – 85% of strokes are ischemic strokes. These strokes occur when either a blood clot forms in one of the arteries that supplies blood to your brain or when a blood clot or other debris forms in another part of the body and moves through your bloodstream and becomes lodged in a brain artery.

Hemorrhagic Stroke – This type of stroke happens when a blood vessel in your brain leaks or ruptures.

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) – This condition if often called a “ministroke” and is usually caused by a temporary decrease in blood supply to part of your brain. TIA mostly last less than five minutes and don’t leave lasting symptoms because the blockage is temporary.

stroke_types

 

“But even if your symptoms are temporary, you should get emergency care,” cautions Dr. Vakani. “If you experience a TIA, then you likely have a partially blocked artery leading to your brain that puts you at a higher risk for a stroke that can cause permanent damage.”

Risk Factors
Some of the more common risk factors for stroke include:
• High blood pressure
• Cigarette smoking
• Diabetes
• Being overweight or obese
• Obstructive sleep apnea
• Use of some birth control pills or hormone therapies that include estrogen

“If you have any of these risk factors, work with your physician to get them under control or, if possible, eliminate them,” suggests Dr. Vakani. “Other risk factors that are out of your control include family history, being 55 or older, race, gender, or history of preeclampsia.”

Diagnosis and Treatment
To determine your treatment for stroke, your doctor may use a variety of methods to determine the type of stroke and to rule out other possible causes of your symptoms. Most likely, a physical exam will be conducted along with blood tests. Your doctor will then decide if other tests are needed like an MRI, CT scan, carotid ultrasound, cerebral angiogram, or echocardiogram.

“The findings of the tests will give your physician the information needed to plan your course of treatment,” says Dr. Vakani. “It is crucial that you follow your doctor’s orders so that you recover as fully as possible and help prevent any other occurrences.”

Dr. Vakani continues, “There are several emergency treatment methods dependant on the type of stroke you experience. For instance, if you have an ischemic stroke, quick treatment within 4.5 hours with clot-busting drugs (thrombolytics) improves the chances of survival and may reduce any complications from the stroke.”

After emergency treatment, the next step is to help you recover as much function possible. Most stroke patients will need intensive therapy in a rehabilitation program. Your healthcare providers will prescribe a regimen of therapy that takes into consideration your lifestyle, age, overall health and degree of disability. Depending on your needs, you may stay in the hospital for therapy, be transferred to a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility, or have therapy in your home.

“According to The National Stroke Association, stroke touches approximately 795,000 people a year in the U.S. and only four percent of patients are appropriately treated,” says Dr. Vakani. “Always play it safe and get immediate medical attention if you think a stroke is in progress. It could save your life.”

Need a cardiologist? Visit our online Find a Physician tool at HarnettHealth.org.

Angier Medical nationally recognized with Excellence Through Insight Award

July 31st, 2014

Angier Medical Services Earns an EXCELLENCE THROUGH INSIGHT Award

for Overall Patient Experience in the CG-CAHPS Database

 

 Angier, NC (July 31, 2014) - Angier Medical Services, a physician practice of Harnett Health System, was recently recognized with an Excellence through Insight award for Overall Patient Experience in the CG-CAHPS database by HealthStream, Inc. (NASDAQ: HSTM).

Angier Medical Services was awarded this honor for its commitment to excellence in patient care. To qualify for an award, a hospital must have been a patient satisfaction-tracking client of HealthStream in 2013, scored in the 75th percentile or higher, and surveyed a minimum of 100 patients. Angier Medical Services was chosen for receiving the highest ratings in Overall Patient Experience clinic satisfaction from among HealthStream’s clients, as well as exceeding industry standards. With a score of 92.7%, Angier Medical Services was the only practice in North Carolina to be recognized and ranked among the Top 5 clinics in the HealthStream database. Nation-wide, the average score was 79.8%.

Ken Bryan, CEO of Harnett Health applauds the practice’s hard work, “Our entire organization focuses on quality patient experiences, and this is a tremendous accomplishment for Dr. Butler and his staff. We’ve been putting processes in place to make sure our patients feel valued and appreciated, whether they are a patient in one of our hospitals, an outpatient at a clinic, or a patient at one of our primary care practices.”

Brad Butler, MD, board certified family practitioner at Angier Medical says, “This is truly an honor for all of us at Angier Medical Services. Our staff works diligently to provide excellent patient care, and being nationally recognized by HealthStream is an indication we are on the right track.”

HealthStream CEO Robert A. Frist, Jr. said, “We applaud Angier Medical Services’ high-level commitment to excellence in healthcare, and are pleased to recognize their achievement through our presentation of an Excellence through Insight award.”

 

About Harnett Health

Harnett Health is a private, not-for-profit healthcare system based in Dunn, N.C. The system encompasses a network of facilities throughout Harnett and Johnston counties and has more than 265 credentialed providers and more than 1,000 employees. The system includes Betsy Johnson Hospital in Dunn, N.C. with 101 beds and Central Harnett Hospital in Lillington, N.C. with 50 private inpatient rooms. Services offered through Harnett Health include outpatient rehab/wellness centers in Benson, N.C., Dunn, N.C., and Lillington, N.C., and cardiac rehabilitation services, a breast care center, outpatient cardiac testing and a wound care center in Dunn, N.C. The healthcare system has six physician practices: Angier Medical Services, Coats Medical Services, Dunn Medical Services, Lillington Medical Services, Harnett OB/GYN and Premiere Pediatrics. It also has a Foundation focused on fundraising, providing a personal touch for patients with extraordinary needs, and working to expand access to care for our community. For more information, visit www.harnetthealth.org.

 

About HealthStream
HealthStream (NASDAQ: HSTM) is dedicated to improving patient outcomes through the development of healthcare organizations’ greatest asset: their people. Our unified suite of software-as-a-service (SaaS) solutions is contracted by, collectively, approximately 3.85 million healthcare employees in the U.S. for workforce development, training & learning management, talent management, performance assessment, and managing simulation-based education programs. Our research solutions provide valuable insight to healthcare providers to meet HCAHPS requirements, improve the patient experience, engage their workforce, and enhance physician alignment. Based in Nashville, Tennessee, HealthStream has additional offices in Laurel, Maryland, Brentwood, Tennessee, Pensacola, Florida, and Jericho, New York. For more information, visit http://www.healthstream.com or call 800-933-9293.

 

Safe Sitter Classes at Harnett Health

May 28th, 2014

Safe Sitter® Classes at Harnett Health

 

Harnett County, N.C. (May 29, 2014) – Harnett Health will once again offer Safe Sitter® courses to our community at Betsy Johnson Hospital in Dunn and Central Harnett Hospital in Lillington. Safe Sitter® is a national program for 11 to 14 year olds to teach them life-saving skills that are useful while they are home alone or babysitting younger children. The 6 ½-hour course include these topics: Babysitting as a Business, Success on the Job, Child Care Essentials, Safety for the Sitter, Injury Management, Preventing Problem Behavior, Care of Choking Infant, Care of Choking Child, and an introduction to Preventing Injuries and Behavior Management. All sites registered to teach Safe Sitter® utilize only Safe Sitter® trained Instructors for student instruction thus ensuring high quality and compliance with teaching methodologies.

 

The registration fee is $35 and includes the Safe Sitter® Kit. One-day class dates are as follows:

Thursday, June 19th, 9:00am – 4:00pm at Betsy Johnson Hospital in Organizational Development

Thursday, June 26th, 9:00am – 4:00pm at Betsy Johnson Hospital in Organizational Development

Wednesday, July 16th, 9:00am – 4:00pm at Central Harnett Hospital in the Board Room

Wednesday, July 23rd, 9:00am – 4:00pm at Betsy Johnson Hospital in Organizational Development

Tuesday, August 12th, 9:00am – 4:00pm at Central Harnett Hospital in the Conference Room

 

To register contact Abby Barefoot at 910-892-1000 ext. 4111 or abby.barefoot@harnetthealth.org.

Annual Foundation Golf Tournament May 15th

April 28th, 2014

Harnett Health Foundation Hosts Annual Charity Golf Tournament

Harnett County, N.C. (April 25, 2014) – The Harnett Health Foundation will host its annual Charity Golf Tournament on Thursday, May 15. This Captain’s Choice Scramble will be held at Anderson Creek Golf Club in Spring Lake, N.C. with check-in at 9 a.m. and a 10 a.m. shotgun start.

Held during National Hospital Week, the tournament theme is “Compassion, Innovation, Dedication: The Commitment Continues” and celebrates the men and women who, day in and day out, remain committed to improving the health of their communities through compassionate care, constant innovation, and unwavering, unmatched dedication.

“The Foundation’s mission is to support Harnett Health by positively impacting the health and wellness of all of our communities through our philanthropic efforts and our supportive programs,” said Harnett Health Foundation Board Chair, Cornelia T. Stewart. “Our goal is to further expand access to quality and compassionate healthcare throughout Harnett County and surrounding areas.”

Proceeds from the tournament will benefit the work of the Harnett Health Foundation in our community. Also, the Foundation is honoring the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) by donating funds from raised from a longest drive challenge for this organization. The WWP nurtures the minds and bodies of service members who incurred a physical or mental injury or illness so they can successfully adjust to their lives back home. Some key focus areas of the WWP are combat stress and recovery, family support, peer mentoring, economic empowerment to return warriors to work, and encouragement to participate in adaptive sports events.

Tournament Details – Win A Car!
Register Today – don’t let this opportunity get away! Entries for the tournament are limited to the first 120 players to sign up. Visit http://www.harnetthealth.org/golf/ to sign up or call the Foundation office at 910-892-1000 ext. 4483.

With four individuals per team, the tournament will be broken down into two flights to indicate skill level. A winner will be determined from each flight.

Extra incentives for the tournament include the chance to win a Ford Mustang Convertible donated by Precision Ford by scoring a hole-in-one, and there will also be a raffle and a variety of prizes and incentives for competitions throughout the tournament. Red tees and Mulligans will be for sale the day of the tournament as well as the opportunity to have the longest drive champion to tee up for your team.

The tournament will kick off with a light breakfast served followed by lunch that will be delivered to players on the course. Hors d’oeurves with awards and presentations will follow the tournament.

“Anderson Creek is one of the finest courses I’ve played and is more than ready to host a major golfing event,” commented the 1997 PGA Championship Winner David Love III who designed the course. Anderson Creek Club was rated 4-stars by Golf Digest in 2008 as well as being the winner of the “Best New Course in NC” for 2001.

Sponsors
“This year’s tournament would not be possible without the help of Harnett Health Foundation supporters,” said Stewart. “We truly value our sponsors and look forward to the tournament and to our Benefit Evening coming in October.”

Sponsors at the Presenting, Title and Major sponsor levels for the annual Charity Golf Tournament include:

Presenting Sponsor: Machine & Welding Supply Company
Title Sponsor: Summit Healthcare
Major Sponsor: First Citizens Bank

Thank you to our all our generous sponsors for supporting the Harnett Health Foundation!

Sponsorships for the tournament are still available and start at only $200. To learn how to become a sponsor please visit our website at www.harnetthealth.org/golf.

For more questions concerning registration, sponsorships or general Foundation information, you can contact the Foundation office by phone at (910) 892-1000 ext. 4483 or by e-mail at foundation@harnetthealth.org.

Harnett Health Among Top 25 Healthiest Employers

January 20th, 2014

Harnett Health Wins Triangle Business Journal 2013 Healthiest Employer Award

Harnett Health ranked 18th out of top 25


Harnett County, N.C. (January 20, 2014)
– Harnett Health has received a 2013 Triangle Business Journal Healthiest Employer of the Triangle award.

The top 25 companies selected for this honor were recognized at an awards presentation where the rankings were revealed. Harnett Health placed 18th.

“We are thrilled to be recognized for our commitment to providing health and wellness programs for our employees,” said Sondra Davis, Harnett Health Vice President of Human Resources and System Development. “Our employees are an asset to our organization, and we understand the value of providing health and wellness and life/work balance options for them.”

An article published in the Triangle Business Journal (TBJ) on October 29, 2013 provides award details, “The awards recognize companies and nonprofit entities that commit to making wellness a priority while proactively shaping the health of their employees. Winning companies completed an online assessment with our [TBJ] partner, Healthiest Employers Inc. This non-biased measurement scored wellness programs in comparison to regional and national employers.”

Companies were measured on six categories:

  • Culture and Leadership Commitment
  • Foundational Components
  • Strategic Planning
  • Communication and Marketing
  • Programming and Interventions
  • Reporting and Analysis

 

About Harnett Health

Harnett Health is a private, not-for-profit healthcare system based in Dunn, N.C. The system is accredited by The Joint Commission and encompasses a network of facilities throughout Harnett and Johnston counties. It has more than 265 credentialed providers and more than 1,000 employees. The system includes Betsy Johnson Hospital in Dunn, N.C. with 101 beds and Central Harnett Hospital in Lillington, N.C. with 50 private inpatient rooms. Services offered through Harnett Health include outpatient rehab/wellness centers in Benson, N.C., Dunn, N.C., and Lillington, N.C., and cardiac rehabilitation services, a breast care center, outpatient cardiac testing and a wound care center in Dunn, N.C. The healthcare system has six physician practices: Angier Medical Services, Coats Medical Services, Dunn Medical Services, Lillington Medical Services, Harnett OB/GYN, and Premiere Pediatrics. It also has a Foundation focused on fundraising, providing a personal touch for patients with extraordinary needs, and working to expand access to care for our community. For more information, visit www.harnetthealth.org.

 

One Year Anniversary of Central Harnett Hospital

Harnett Health is celebrating the one year anniversary of the opening of Central Harnett Hospital in Lillington, N.C. The state-of-the art facility opened on January 18, 2013 increasing access to healthcare for residents in a five county area. From its opening through the end of December 2013, 19,835 emergency patients and 1,107 inpatients were treated along with 18,965 imaging services, 95,284 lab procedures, and 556 surgeries were performed at our new hospital.

 

 

Harnett OB/GYN Receives National Recognition For Patient-Centered Care

January 20th, 2014

Harnett Health Receives National Recognition For Patient-Centered Care

Harnett County, N.C. (January 17, 2014) – Harnett Health is proud to announce that its obstetrics and gynecology practice, Harnett OB/GYN, has received national recognition from the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) for being certified in the Physician Practice Connections–Patient-Centered Medical Home program. The practice is recognized at level three of the program, the highest achievable level.

The program uses evidence-based, patient-centered processes that focus on highly coordinated care and long-term participative relationships. The program’s standards emphasize enhanced care through patient-clinician partnership.

Harnett OB/GYN is accepting new patients and is located at 608 Tilghman Drive in Dunn. Patients may also been seen at Lillington Medical Services located at 716 N. 10th Street in Lillington. Call 910-892-4092 for an appointment at either location. Physicians serving patients through the practice include Michael Zich, MD, FACOG and Michelle Langaker, DO, FACOG.

“Our Harnett OB/GYN physicians and staff are thrilled to be certified in the Patient-Centered Medical Home program,” said Harnett Health’s Vice President of Medical Affairs, Wallace Horne, MD, MMM. “The practice is focused on building and strengthening long-term relationships with patients.”

The practice met key program components in the following areas:

  • Written standards for patient access and enhanced communications
  • Appropriate use of charting tools to track patients and organize clinical information
  • Responsive care management techniques with an emphasis on preventive care
  • Adaptation to patient’s cultural and linguistic needs
  • Use of information technology for prescriptions and care management
  • Use of evidenced-based guidelines to treat chronic conditions
  • Systematic tracking of referrals and test results
  • Measurement and reporting of clinical and service performance

 Harnett Health also has four additional primary care practices certified at the highest achievable level (Level 3) in the Physician Practice Connections–Patient-Centered Medical Home program:

  • Angier Medical Services, 185 Rawls Road, Angier, N.C.  27501
  • Lillington Medical Services, 716 N. Tenth St., Lillington, N.C. 27546
  • Premiere Pediatrics, 802 Tilghman Dr., Dunn, N.C.  28335
  • Dunn Medical Services, 803 Tilghman Dr., Dunn, N.C. 28335

“We are very proud that our practices are receiving this national recognition,” continued Dr. Horne. “Our medical staff and office staff work hard each day to provide quality, compassionate care to our patients and look forward to serving you and your family for years to come.”

 The Patient-Centered Medical Home program is a model of healthcare delivery that aims to improve the quality and efficiency of care. It identifies practices that promote partnerships between individual patients and their personal physicians. Each patient’s care is tended to by physician-led care teams, who provide for all the patient’s healthcare needs and coordinate treatments across the healthcare system.

 Medical home physicians demonstrate the benchmarks of patient-centered care, including open scheduling, expanded hours and appropriate use of proven health information systems. Evaluations of the program have shown results in improving quality care and lowering costs for the patients by increasing access to more efficient, more coordinated care.

 

About Harnett Health

Harnett Health is a private, not-for-profit healthcare system based in Dunn, N.C. The system is accredited by The Joint Commission and encompasses a network of facilities throughout Harnett and Johnston counties. It has more than 265 credentialed providers and more than 1,000 employees. The system includes Betsy Johnson Hospital in Dunn, N.C. with 101 beds and Central Harnett Hospital in Lillington, N.C. with 50 private inpatient rooms. Services offered through Harnett Health include outpatient rehab/wellness centers in Benson, N.C., Dunn, N.C., and Lillington, N.C., and cardiac rehabilitation services, a breast care center, outpatient cardiac testing and a wound care center in Dunn, N.C. The healthcare system has six physician practices: Angier Medical Services, Coats Medical Services, Dunn Medical Services, Lillington Medical Services, Harnett OB/GYN, and Premiere Pediatrics. It also has a Foundation focused on fundraising, providing a personal touch for patients with extraordinary needs, and working to expand access to care for our community. For more information, visit www.harnetthealth.org.

 

About NCQA
NCQA is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to improving health care quality. NCQA accredits and certifies a wide range of health care organizations. It also recognizes clinicians and practices in key areas of performance. NCQA is committed to providing health care quality information for consumers, purchasers, health care providers and researchers.

Campbell University Athletics Supports Harnett Health

January 16th, 2014

The Campbell University Athletics Department and Harnett Health have partnered together to raise funds for local citizens in need through a new website (www.GoCamels.org) and through Campbell University sporting events. The proceeds raised will go to the Harnett Health Foundation.

“Campbell Athletics wanted to partner with a local organization that raised money to support local citizens,” said Jarrad Turner, Assistant Athletic Director for Marketing and Promotions, Campbell University. “When I learned about the Harnett Health Foundation and the work it does locally to support patients in great need, I knew joining forces with Harnett Health and putting the proceeds toward the Harnett Health Foundation would be a good thing for our community.”

Maureen Mercho, the Harnett Health Foundation’s new Executive Director, continues, “We created a partnership that helps to increase awareness in the community for both organizations while raising money for local healthcare needs. The funds support the Foundation, which in turn completes a review process to ensure the funds stay local and are utilized in meeting our greatest patient needs. The partnership emphasis is keeping the funds in our community to help our neighbors.”

The partnership includes athletic events to raise funds and a website to collection donations. “We have planned men’s and women’s basketball games in January and February,” said Turner. “We will have a variety of opportunities during the basketball games for people to have fun and make a donation to the Harnett Health Foundation. If you are not able to make it to a game, you can make a donation on our dedicated fund raising website at www.GoCamels.org. Please note it’s dot O-R-G.”

Black Out Cancer Game– Men’s Basketball
Saturday, January 18 at 2 p.m.
John Pope, Jr. Convocation Center
We want to black out cancer! Fans are encouraged to wear black to the game and will have the opportunity to purchase a $5 black Campbell t-shirt and also spin a prize wheel for $2 (every spin wins a prize) with proceeds going to the Harnett Health Foundation. Fans may also make a direct donation to the Foundation at the game. Healthcare professionals will be honored at the game and will receive free admission to the game.

Pink Game – Women’s Basketball
Saturday, February 1 at 2 p.m.
John Pope, Jr. Convocation Center
This game is planned in recognition of National Girls and Women in Sports Day, which is February 5. Also, breast cancer survivors will be honored at halftime and pink t-shirts will be given away to fans. Fans will have the opportunity to spin a prize wheel for $2 (every spin wins a prize) with the proceeds going to the Harnett Health Foundation, or fans may make a direct donation to the Foundation.

Harnett Health and Campbell University Establish Strategic Partnership

January 15th, 2014

Harnett Health System, Inc. and Campbell University have established a formal, strategic partnership to transform healthcare in Harnett County and beyond. Both organizations will collaboratively work to achieve all aspects of a major and comprehensive healthcare community.

Harnett Health President and CEO Ken Bryan said, “In today’s healthcare climate, healthcare organizations that are successful build strategically important and stable partnerships to enhance the quality of care, reduce the costs of care, and expand the scope of healthcare services across a significant geographical region. This partnership accomplishes all three goals to ensure healthcare is developed throughout our area.”

While the partnership will take on many forms as opportunities arise, the first two key actions are to ensure that the need for physicians, especially in primary care, is effectively addressed and to promptly establish a residency program to train and keep physicians in the area after residency training.

The Jerry M. Wallace School of Osteopathic Medicine at Campbell University welcomed its first class of 160 students in August 2013. Students will spend the first two years learning on the Harnett County campus in state-of-the-art simulation and anatomy labs before being assigned to training opportunities in regional community hospitals.

Both organizations are working to have a Campbell Residency Program with Harnett Health in place for 2015 to provide the continued training for these students.

Dr. John Kauffman, dean of the School of Osteopathic Medicine, said this model is ideal for training primary care physicians, particularly physicians who will practice in rural and underserved areas. “By placing our students in community hospitals for their third and fourth years and having residency programs available once they graduate, we believe it will enable our students to put down roots and become the next generation of physicians who practice in this community,” said Kauffman. “These students will be your pediatricians, your family doctors, your internists, your surgeons, your OBGYNs and your emergency medical physicians.”

North Carolina currently ranks 34th in the nation in primary care physicians. The need is particularly great in rural counties. Though there are four other allopathic medical schools in our state, less than half of medical school graduates from North Carolina medical schools remain in North Carolina to practice.

Dr. Jerry M. Wallace, president of Campbell University continues, “The ability for Campbell University to supply quality providers of care and the ability for Harnett Health to offer the chance for those providers to practice medicine is a marriage of tremendous benefit to citizens.”

However, the partnership doesn’t end with the training of primary care physicians.“Campbell University is providing comprehensive training for North Carolina’s next generation of healthcare professionals,” said Ronald W. Maddox, Pharm. D., Chairman of the Harnett Health Board of Trustees. “With an approach that emphasizes interprofessional training among students in Campbell’s pharmacy, physician assistant, clinical research, physical therapy, public health, and medical programs, Harnett Health and Campbell University are indeed poised to transform healthcare in Harnett County and beyond.”

The organizations have already contributed significantly to this transformation through the opening of Central Harnett Hospital and the opening of the Jerry M. Wallace School of Osteopathic Medicine. These aligned efforts are the largest single capital investment in Harnett County’s history.

Ernest Alphin, chairman of the Harnett Health Board of Trustees’ Finance Committee, said, “This is a significant investment by Harnett Health. Our board is steadfast in its resolve to make sure we continue to invest appropriately in the growth of healthcare in the area and in making a major positive impact on the local economy.”

“It is an extremely exciting time for all invested in healthcare in our region,” said H. West Lawson, MD, WakeMed’s Chief Medical Officer and Harnett Health Board of Trustees member. “This partnership represents years of hard work from both Campbell University and Harnett Health as they continue to improve access to quality healthcare in Eastern North Carolina through training and job opportunities for providers. It is also a huge benefit to citizens to stay close to home for their healthcare needs.”

One-Year Anniversary of Central Harnett Hospital

Harnett Health is celebrating the one year anniversary of the opening of Central Harnett Hospital in Lillington. The state-of-the art facility opened on January 18, 2013 increasing access to healthcare for residents in a five county area. From its opening through the end of December 2013, our new hospital treated 19,835 emergency patients and 1,107 inpatients, provided imaging services to 18,965, and performed 95,284 lab procedures and 556 surgeries.

About Harnett Health

Harnett Health is a private, not-for-profit healthcare system based in Dunn, N.C. The system encompasses a network of facilities throughout Harnett and Johnston counties and has more than 265 credentialed providers and more than 1,000 employees. The system includes Betsy Johnson Hospital in Dunn, N.C. with 101 beds and Central Harnett Hospital in Lillington, N.C. with 50 private inpatient rooms. Services offered through Harnett Health include outpatient rehab/wellness centers in Benson, N.C., Dunn, N.C., and Lillington, N.C., and cardiac rehabilitation services, a breast care center, outpatient cardiac testing and a wound care center in Dunn, N.C. The healthcare system has six physician practices: Angier Medical Services, Coats Medical Services, Dunn Medical Services, Lillington Medical Services, Harnett OB/GYN and Premiere Pediatrics. It also has a Foundation focused on fundraising, providing a personal touch for patients with extraordinary needs, and working to expand access to care for our community. For more information, visit www.harnetthealth.org.

About Campbell University & the Jerry M. Wallace School of Osteopathic Medicine

When the Jerry M. Wallace School of Osteopathic Medicine opened at Campbell University in August 2013, it was the first new school of medicine in North Carolina in over 35 years. The mission of the Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine is to educate and prepare community-based osteopathic physicians in a Christian environment to care for the rural and underserved populations in North Carolina, the Southeastern United States and the nation. The following values drive the medical school’s faculty, staff and students: teamwork, leadership, professionalism, integrity, diversity and the ethical treatment of all humanity. 

Campbell University is comprised of seven schools. The University began addressing health care issues in 1985 with the establishment of the nationally acclaimed School of Pharmacy, which was the first new pharmacy school founded in nearly 40 years. In addition to offering the Doctor of Pharmacy program, the school offers undergraduate and graduate programs in Clinical Research and Pharmaceutical Sciences. In 2009, the name was formally changed to the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences to provide additional health science programs, including the newly established Physician Assistant Studies program (2011), Master of Public Health (2012), and Doctor of Physical Therapy (2014).